I was diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease and Peripheral Neuropathy in 2006, but my symptoms seemed to take a turn in a different direction in late 2007, and the diagnosis was changed to Essential Myoclonus. Then in 2010 I was diagnosed with Type II Diabetes. Finally, after a muscle biopsy, it was determined that I have Mitochondrial Myopathy.

Share my journey - coping with the testing, the medicines, nutrition, digestion problems, exercise, the emotions, uncertain diagnoses and no telling what else!

"But they that wait upon the LORD shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings as eagles; they shall run, and not be weary; and they shall walk, and not faint." Isaiah 40:31 KJV

Sunday, February 02, 2014

Continuing with the LCHF Lifestyle

I've spent the last month gradually changing over to eating on the Low Carb High Fat (LCHF) lifestyle. I say lifestyle, not only because it's such a drastic change from what we've all been told was best for us, but because it's not really a weight loss diet. And that's what everyone thinks if you say you're on a diet.

Anyway, I was well on my way to eating this way already, since I'm diabetic. So it's probably not been as hard for me as it would most people. But it's still been quite an adjustment to stop eating ALL grains, beans, and below ground vegetables.

I have enjoyed eating all the eggs! And they have naturally the right percentage of fat, carb, and protein. Other diets, such as Atkins, replace the carbs with more protein. But this diet replaces all the carbs with fat calories. And I can state categorically - I'm not hungry!!

There are lots of possibilities as far as what I could be eating, but here's a general idea of what a day is like for me now. Breakfast is 1/4 cup of nut pieces, a tablespoon of flax meal, and a cup of almond or coconut milk. I eat it as if it were cereal, and that keeps me going just fine until lunch.

Lunch at home is what it's always been (since I was diagnosed with Type II Diabetes). Hubby cooks a stir fry of vegetables in olive oil, often with ham. He still eats whole grain bread with it, but I don't.

Afternoon snack is usually half of an avocado or something called a chocolate Fat Bomb. It's a homemade chocolate candy that is basically unsweetened cocoa, butter, and coconut oil.

I'm keeping track of my food intake on http://www.myfitnesspal.com, so I can tell how many calories I have left for the day. I do hope to lose some belly fat on this diet, so I've set a calorie limit for myself. And I need to learn how to keep the protein and carb intake low and the fat count high, so tracking my nutrition is helpful. Once I see where I stand nutrition wise, I decide how many eggs I can have for supper and whether I can add cheese, spinach, and/or mushrooms.

It's really weird. I've not craved any sweets I was used to eating, like ice cream on Sundays. I do miss the great sandwiches chock full of veggies that hubby used to fix me for dinner, but I can still have them as a salad.

I found an easy to fix coconut flour and egg bread substitute that cooks in the microwave. I make that when I'm craving bread.

Eating out has been the hardest to adjust to, and we eat out several times a week on average. But again, I was already used to finding suitable foods in restaurants, because of the diabetic restrictions, and that helped. So far I've been able to stick to the ketogenic diet pretty well.

And the Ketostix test strips I use show that I am in Ketosis. That's the secret to this lifestyle. The goal is to change the cells over to using ketones for energy, instead of carbs. Mitochondria use ketones more efficiently than they do glucose, which is supposed to increase my energy level. It has definitely done that. There's no difference in pain level yet, and as long as I stay on the pain meds I may not see an improvement in the brain fog, but I'm still optimistic about that improving in the future.

As I see my energy level increase it gives me reason to continue with this lifestyle, with the hope that the brain fog will lift, and the improved mitochondrial activity will lessen my muscle pain. Only time and patience will tell.

7 comments:

mcolburn said...

I ran across your blog while searching nutritional info for my husband who has mitochondrial myopathy. Your info you have posted from your experience is great. I have actually sat her and read through most We too are close to UAB... That is where he was actually diagnosed. He has off and in days with his condition. Today is actually a rough day for him is I find myself sitting here searching for whatever I can to help him... Or us. I am very interested in possible boosting his system with a diet change. I ran across your blog while searching nutritional info for my husband who has mitochondrial myopathy. Your info you have posted from your experience is great. I have actually sat her and read through most We too are close to UAB... That is where he was actually diagnosed. He has off and on days with his condition. Today is actually a rough day for him and as usual, I find myself sitting here searching for whatever I can to be able to help him... Or us. I am very interested in possibly boosting his system with a diet change. He has never seen a nutritionist before... He would probably shudder at the idea...He prefers French fries over steamed veggies:)
I hope you continue to post on this blog. I would love to hear more from you and your experiences with this rare disease.

Dirty Butter said...

I'm glad you've found my posts about my diagnosis with Mitochondrial Myopathy to be helpful. I know exactly what you mean about grabbing at anything that might be helpful. And this LCHF lifestyle certainly takes commitment. You're supposed to be able to tell if it's helpful within about 2 months, if you could get him to commit to that.

We live down 280 over the mountain. About where are you?

mcolburn said...

We are in Shelby County... Actually Alabaster. I teach school. I find myself searching for info for him all the time. I feel like he was given this diagnosis, but not given much info about it all. He sees a dr at the Kirklin Clinic at UAB. He just had a checkup and was not given the greatest of news.
Did you get your nutritional info from the nutritionist you saw or from researching it yourself?

mcolburn said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Dirty Butter said...

As I suppose you've already read here on my blog, they told me to take CoEnzymeQ10 and vitamin b2. I did a great deal of research about supplements on my own. Over time I must have tried a $1000 worth of various antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals. I still take a large number every day, but I've dropped a lot of them. I maybe spend $100 a month on a variety of pills. Eating my vitamins just makes more sense. And eating what God meant for us to eat makes even more sense!

Dirty Butter said...

If you'd like to continue this conversation privately, you can leave a message at http://plushmemories.com/contact-us/, and I'll email you back so we have each other's email addresses.

mcolburn said...

Will do! Thanks